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Chlamydia
(Chlamydia trachomatis)

Risk of infection from oral sex:
  • Giving oral sex to a partner with an infected penis can cause chlamydia in the throat.

  • Giving oral sex to a partner with an infected vagina or urinary tract may cause chlamydia in the throat.*

  • Giving oral sex to a partner with an infected rectum might cause chlamydia in the throat.*

  • Getting oral sex on the penis from a partner with chlamydia in the throat can cause chlamydia of the penis.

  • Getting oral sex on the vagina from a partner with chlamydia in the throat might cause chlamydia of the vagina or urinary tract.*

  • Getting oral sex on the anus from a partner with chlamydia in the throat might cause chlamydia in the rectum.*

* Statements with an asterisk (*) need more research.

Areas of initial infection:
  • Throat

  • Genitals

  • Urinary tract

  • Rectum

 
Initial signs and symptoms of infection:
  • Most chlamydia infections in the throat have no symptoms. When symptoms are present, they can include a sore throat.

  • Many genital, urinary tract, or rectal chlamydia infections have no symptoms. When symptoms are present, they can include:

    • Discharge from the vagina or penis (discharge from the vagina may be bloody)

    • Burning feeling when peeing

    • Painful or swollen testicles

    • Rectal pain or discharge

 
Treatment:
  • The right medicine can cure chlamydia.

  • Sex partners of a person with chlamydia should also receive testing to ensure there is no infection. People with chlamydia should not have sex until 7 days after they and their sex partners receive and complete treatment.

 
If left untreated, throat infections:
  • Can spread to sex partners who do not have the infection, often by performing oral sex on a male partner’s penis.

 
If left untreated, genital, urinary and/or rectal infections:
      • chronic pelvic pain,

      • infertility, and

      • ectopic pregnancy (a pregnancy in the fallopian tube or outside of the womb)

  • In pregnant people:

    • Might result in premature birth or low birth weight in babies.

    • Can spread to the baby during delivery and cause infection in the eyes or respiratory tract.

  • In men:

    • Can cause epididymitis, a painful condition of the ducts attached to the testicles that may lead to ductal scarring.

  • In everyone:

    • May increase risk of getting HIV infection.

    • Might increase risk of spreading HIV to sex partners.

    • May cause a reaction throughout the body known as reactive arthritis. This can lead to:

      • arthritis (joint pain)

      • conjunctivitis (pink eye)

      • a rash on the soles of the feet or elsewhere

STDs and HIV – CDC Basic Fact Sheet

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Fast Facts

  • Many sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) spread through oral sex.

  • Using a condom, dental dam, or other barrier methods the right way every time you have oral sex can reduce the risk of giving or getting an STD.

  • There is little to no risk of getting or transmitting HIV from oral sex.

 

What is Oral Sex?

Oral sex involves using the mouth to stimulate the genitals or genital area of a sex partner. Types of oral sex include the penis (fellatio), vagina (cunnilingus), and anus (anilingus).

Oral sex is commonly practiced by sexually active adults. More than 85% of sexually active adults aged 18-44 years reported having oral sex at least once with a partner of the opposite sex. A separate survey conducted during 2011 to 2015 found that 41% of teenagers aged 15-19 years reported having oral sex with a partner of the opposite sex.

Can STDs Spread During Oral Sex?

  

Yes.

 

Many STDs and other infections are spread through oral sex. Anyone exposed to an infected partner can get an STD in the mouth, throat, genitals, or rectum. The risk of getting an STD or spreading an STD to others through oral sex depends on several things, including the particular STD, type of sex, and number of sex acts performed.

In general:

  • It is possible to get some STDs in the mouth or throat after giving oral sex to a partner who has a genital or anal/rectal STD.

  • It is possible to get certain STDs on the genitals and genital areas after receiving oral sex from a partner with a mouth or throat infection.

  • It is possible to have an STD in more than one area at the same time. For example, you can have an STD in the throat and the genitals.

    Which STDs Can Be Passed On from Oral Sex?

  • Several STDs (i.e., syphilis, gonorrhea, and intestinal infections) that are transmitted by oral sex can spread in the body.

  • Oral sex involving the anus (or anilingus) can transmit hepatitis A and B. It also can transmit intestinal parasites like Giardia and bacteria like E.coli and Shigella.

  • If you have an STD, you might not know it because many STDs are symptomless. It is possible to spread STDs even when you don’t have any signs or symptoms.

 

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